Computer Monitors

Recycle with E-Waste
See Alternatives
Illegal in Garbage or Drains
Trash Bin

Never Throw in the Trash

Computer monitors, including cathode ray tube (CRT), LCD and plasma, are considered hazardous waste. Never throw computer or television monitors in the trash, because some types will leach lead into the environment.

Alternative Ways to Recycle

sims

Sims Recycling Solutions

Sims Recycling Solutions, who is contracted by Apple and Microsoft, responsibly recycles computers and displays. To recycle a computer monitor, regardless of the brand, pack up the equipment and send it off with a prepaid shipping label.

Staples

Staples' Take Back Program

Staples offers free, in-store recycling for your unwanted electronics, including desktop computers, tablets, monitors, printers and other electronics. Locate your nearest Staples.

Best-Buy-logo

Best Buy's Electronics and Appliances Recycling Program

Best Buy will take back monitors and many other home electronics for free; they also offer a buy back program for more desired electronics. They accept up to three items per day from each household. Find the nearest store.

Apple

Apple Store Gift Card

Apple runs a reuse and recycling program for unwanted iPhones, iPads, Mac or PC computers and displays. Depending on the condition of your electronics, Apple can give you credit if they have monetary value. Find out more.

microsoft

Microsoft Trade-In and Recycling Program

Visit any Microsoft store location to trade in old devices, game consoles or games for Microsoft store credit. If your items no longer carry substantial value, they will be wiped of data and safely recycled. If you aren’t near a store location, you can request a prepaid postage label to mail in your items.

Did You Know?

The Problem of E-Waste

E-waste is a dangerous business in India and China, where e-waste recycling plants release toxic chemicals into the air and cause health problems for recycling workers. To learn more about e-waste, check out The Story of Stuff Project.

Developed Countries and Their E-Waste

In 2014, the world generated about 46.1 million tons of e-waste. Together, the U.S. and China generated one-third of this total, according to a report by the United Nations University. That’s over 15 million tons of electronic waste in one year from two countries alone. Total e-waste generation is estimated to grow close to 20 percent by 2018.